Yesterday morning was looking to bring a fine day. Even by 9am on a Sunday families were already occupying their little territories of the receding beach at Crackington as the tide was heading for one of its high points for the day. I had headed down there a little earlier than normal to give myself some beachcombing and wondering-about time before the rest of the volunteer beach clean started officially at 10.

Just sitting offshore at about a half a mile was a band of cloud, stretching up and down the coast and looking touch and go about whether it would roll in toward the beach goers as a sea mist to blank out the blue skies and warmth and spoil their suntan plans for a while.

It’s not that unusual in the heat of the summer to find the coast shrouded in a mist when inland is already soaking up some rays. In the end it dissipated gradually, almost unnoticed as the temperature of the day rose, but before it did I captured it sitting over the pyramid-like headlands of Cambeak, just to the south of the beach. The activity of the day could continue in the sun.

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6 thoughts on “Offshore Mists

    1. There is more of the veined rocks (lines of quartz) in this one https://cornishbearsphotos.com/2018/01/26/rocks-of-crackington/
      The ‘white marbles’ made me think… then I realised that there are a lot of limpets stuck fast to the rocks, that’ll be what they are. They’re tenacious and can survive fine just stuck there in the sun but tend to be more numerous a little further out where they can minimise the time spent uncovered by the sea.

      Liked by 1 person

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